Swine Diseases
[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Welcome to Antwi Farms !

We work to help people find various information about animal production; as well as to remind everyone, that in our modern world, there are still a lot of places where people have various difficulties feeding themselves: Antwi Farms Project.

Home-- Swine-- Goat-- Sheep-- Cattle--
Poultry-- Contact Us-- Comments--
Antwi Farms
GHANA - Agric News
ANTWI FARMS FREE CLASSIFIEDS

Submit Your Announcement Here
Swine imageSwine DiseasesSwine image Worth Watching
Swine Companies - Research - Swine Associations - Swine Guides
Swine Events

Swine - General - Diseases - Economics - Management - Genetic - Reproduction - Nutrition
Housing - Special Tropics - Specialists answer your questions - Feedback
Swine


Chicken


Cattle


Sheep


Business Directory


Worth watching
Controlling External Parasites of Swine
This guide describes some of the more common parasites affecting swine and provides recommendations for controlling them
Read more...
Herd Management for Disease Prevention
Disease control is only one facet of a successful management program. Treatment of disease is not as effective or as economical as prevention. Many outbreaks of disease in swine herds can be avoided by using management practices that include strict sanitation and immunization programs.
Read more...
Vaccines for Farrowing Operations
Routine vaccination is an essential part of a good swine herd health management program because some economically important diseases are extremely difficult to keep out and are commonly present in many herds. Four swine diseases that fit into this category and for which effective vaccines exist are erysipelas, leptospirosis, parvovirus, and colibacillosis.
Read more...
United States Animal Health Association -- Species Information
Many reports are available for your information.
Read more...
Swine waste feeder profile reveals types, sources, amounts and risks of waste fed
federal and state animal health inspectors surveyed the licensed waste feeders in the United States and Puerto Rico to gather information about the practice of feeding waste to swine. This summary presents the highlights of the survey results.
Read more...
Facility Design and Health Interactions
Facility Design and Health Interactions Principles: Segregation of age groups decreases opportunity for disease transmission. Segregation of pens decreases opportunity for disease transmission. Air exchange removes water vapor and thereby reduces...
Read more...
Pig Disease Profile
Laypersons looking for guidance among the target sources of this collection of links are strongly advised to review the information retrieved with their professional veterinarian.
Read more...
Enteric Diseases (Scours) of Swine
This NebGuide describes four major enteric diseases of swine, and discusses the cause, clinical signs, differential diagnosis, treatment, and control of each.
Colibacillosis
Transmissible Gastroenteritis (TGE)
Rotavirus Diarrhea
Clostridium perfringens, Type C Enteritis

Read more...
Plan for Herd Health When Starting a Swine Operation
Herd health is a very important consideration for producers starting a swine operation. The health needs of the swine herd vary somewhat depending on the type of operation you choose, but certain disease prevention concepts apply to any swine operation.
Read more...
Keeping Show Pigs Healthy
Show pigs can bring many diseases into a farm and spread them to other swine. This publication explains how to prevent show pigs from contracting and spreading diseases.
Read more...
Porcine Brucellosis
Brucellosis in pigs is a bacterial infection that, after an initial bacteraemia, causes chronic inflammatory lesions localised in the reproductive organs of both sexes, and in the bones. The infection in pigs is caused by Brucella suis biovars 1, 2 or 3. The disease caused by biovars 1 and 3 is similar, while that caused by biovar 2 differs from 1 and 3 in its host range, its limited geographical distribution and its pathology. Biovar 2 is rarely pathogenic for humans, whereas biovars 1 and 3 are highly pathogenic for humans.
Read more...
ATROPHIC RHINITIS OF SWINE
Atrophic rhinitis, a severe progressive form of rhinitis, is an infectious disease of swine generally characterised by purulent nasal discharge combined with shortening or twisting of the snout, atrophy of the turbinate (conchal) bones and reduced productivity. It is caused by infection with toxigenic strains of Pasteurella multocida alone or in combination with Bordetella bronchiseptica and perhaps other components of the nasal flora. Infections with B. bronchiseptica alone can cause a less severe form, with mild or moderate, nonprogressive turbinate bone atrophy, generally with moderate snout changes.
Read more...
TRANSMISSIBLE GASTROENTERITIS
Transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) is an enteric disease of pigs caused by TGE virus (TGEV), a member of the Coronaviridae. Since 1984, a distinct respiratory variant (porcine respiratory coronavirus or PRCV) has spread throughout many parts of the world. This virus is probably a deletion mutant of TGEV. PRCV does not appear to be an important primary pathogen, but it has greatly complicated the diagnosis of TGE, particularly by serological means. Laboratory diagnosis is made by demonstrating the presence of virus, viral antigens or viral nucleic acid in material from suspected cases, or by demonstrating virus-specific humoral antibodies.
Read more...
Swine Antibiotics and Feed Additives: Food Safety Considerations
The term antibiotic means "against life" or "destructive to life." An antibiotic is a natural compound synthesized by a living organism that inhibits the growth of another living organism.
Read more...
The Virtual Pig Dissection
Images about Pig Dissection - interesting website
Read more...
Risk of feeding food waste to swine: Public Health diseases
Feeding food waste to swine helps producers save money and benefits the public and the environment by reducing landfill use. But studies indicate that unless the waste is cooked first, the spread of disease could result.
Read more...
Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome
Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) is rapidly gaining importance as one of the most economically significant diseases to keep out of Texas swine herds. PRRS virus is spread by pig-to-pig contact throught contaminated mucus, excrement (manure and urine), and semen (artificial insemination and natural service) and possibly by aerosol (airborne) infection.
Read more...
The Virtual Pig Dissection
Images about Pig Dissection - interesting website
Read more...
Risk of feeding food waste to swine: Public Health diseases
Feeding food waste to swine helps producers save money and benefits the public and the environment by reducing landfill use. But studies indicate that unless the waste is cooked first, the spread of disease could result.
Read more...
Swine Pneumonia
Pneumonia is an important disease of the lower respiratory tract that impairs animal health and lowers individual and herd performance in swine. "Pneumonia" means inflammation of the lungs. It may be minor, subsiding quickly, or develop in advanced pneumonia.
Read more...

Atrophic Rhinitis
Rhinitis is an inflammation of the upper respiratory tract and is present to some degree in almost every commercial swine herd. This kind of inflammation can be caused by bacteria, viruses, chemicals (manure gas), dust, pollen, temperature fluctuations, and other irritants in the environment, and can have a negative impact on the affected pig's feed-conversion efficiency and rate of gain.
Read more...

Isolation Procedures for Farrowing Operations
Almost every swine breeding herd will at some time receive breeding stock replacements. These incoming animal are a possible source of herd disease. Once introduced, diseases such as Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRPS), pseudorabies Actinobacillus Pleuropneumonia (APP) transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) and swine dysentery may be very difficult and costly to control of eliminate.
Read more...
The 1997-1998 Epidemic of Classical Swine Fever in the Netherlands
In 1997 the pig husbandry in the Netherlands was struck by a severe epidemic of Classical Swine Fever (CSF). During this epidemic 429 CSF-infected herds were depopulated and approximately 1,300 herds were slaughtered pre-emptively. In addition millions of pigs of herds not CSF-infected were killed for welfare reasons.
Read more...

Hog Cholera
Hog cholera, a highly contagious viral disease of swine, was eradicated from the United States in 1978 after a 16-year effort by the industry and State and Federal governments. Today, only 16 other countries are free of hog cholera. In the spring and summer of 1997, outbreaks of hog cholera were confirmed in Haiti and the Dominican Republic; both countries had eradicated the disease in the early 1980's.
Read more...

Viral Diseases With a Respiratory Component
SI is caused by a type A influenza virus and is confined almost entirely to the respiratory tract of the pig. SI is important because it has major human public health implications; the type A swine influenza virus in pigs can also infect and affect humans. As a matter of fact, there are several well documented cases where this virus occurred in individuals involved in swine production activities.
Read more...

ERYSIPELA
Swine erysipelas is an infectious disease of major economic significance throughout the world. Caused by the Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae bacterium, the disease occurs most often in pigs between three and 12 months of age.
Read more...

Vaccinations for the Swine Herd
Swine producers should vaccinate their pigs to prevent or decrease economic loss from important infectious diseases. Infectious diseases are caused by microorganisms such as bacteria or viruses. Vaccines contain "safe" microorganisms which are injected into a pig to prepare its immune system to resist disease. The safe microorganisms in vaccines are either killed or modified-live. This means that they will activate the immune system but not cause the disease.
Read more...

Care of Pigs From Farrowing to Weaning
The most critical period in the life cycle of a pig is from birth to weaning. On the average, about two pigs per litter are lost during this period. Poor management is the major contributing factor, although the actual cause may be crushing, bleeding from the navel, anemia, starvation or disease.
Read more...

Swine Health Program
Swine disease outbreaks are often related to a high concentration of pigs raised continuously in the same facility or on the same lot or pasture. Overcrowding and continuous use can result in rapid buildup or accumulation of disease producing organisms in the environment. These organisms can infect and keep reinfecting the herd. In addition, the movement of hogs from farm to farm can introduce new infectious disease-producing agents into the herd.
Read more...

Atrophic Rhinitis
Rhinitis is an inflammation of the upper respiratory tract and is present to some degree in almost every commercial swine herd. This kind of inflammation can be cause by bacteria, viruses, chemicals (manure gas), dust, pollen, temperature fluctuations, and other irritants in the environment, and can have a negative impact on the affected pig's feed-conversion efficiency and rate of gain.
Read more...

Mycoplasmal Pneumonia and Other Mycoplasmal Diseases of Swine
Mycoplasmal pneumonia (in the U.S.) or porcine enzootic pneumonia (England and other countries) is caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Another synonym for this disease is swine enzootic pneumonia (SEP). Fifteen years ago this disease was called virus pneumonia of pigs (VPP); since that time it has been discovered that a mycoplasma, not a virus, is the cause. Mycoplasma are very small and readily pass through ordinary bacterial filters. In addition, mycoplasma are difficult to grow in the laboratory. For these reasons, it was originally assumed that mycoplasmal pneumonia was a virus.
Read more...
Improved Average Daily Gain Using Levamisole
Levamisole has been used as an immunomodulator in humans and animals. Levamisole is used in humans for diseases related to imbalances in the regulation of immune responses or deficiencies of the immune system, including autoimmune diseases, chronic and recurrent diseases, chronic infections and cancer. It has beneficial effects on host defence mechanisms and restores depressed immune responses in animals and humans. Levamisole is also approved for use in pigs as a wormer.
Read more...
Plan for Herd Health When Starting a Swine Operation
Herd health is a very important consideration for producers starting a swine operation. The health needs of the swine herd vary somewhat depending on the type of operation you chose, but certain disease prevention concepts apply to any swine operation.
Read more...

Controlling Internal Parasites in Swine
Swine internal parasites (worms) are estimated to cost 250 million dollars annually in the United States but they are not considered to be swine killers. Internal parasites devitalize pigs by robbing them of essential nutrients and injuring vital organs. Pigs heavily parasitized are more susceptible to diseases such as scours and pneumonia. The resulting diseases and unthriftiness are a major cause of economic loss. Swine producers should be aware of the common internal parasites of swine and methods of prevention and control.
Read more...

Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS)
A previously unrecognized disease of swine was first described in the United States in 1987. The condition was characterized by abortion, premature farrowing, stillborn and mummified pigs, and respiratory disease with death loss and chronic poor performance of nursing and weaned pigs.
Read more...

Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) Virus
This NebGuide explains Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome--its symptoms, transmission and diagnosis; and it discusses methods of prevention, management and control.
The etiological agents of PRRS was confirmed to be a positive-stranded enveloped RNA virus in 1991 at the Central Veterinary Institute in the Netherlands. Classification in the Arteriviridae family has been proposed. Other viruses included in this new virus family include lactate dehydrogenase elevating virus (LDV), equine arteritis virus (EAV), and simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV). Numerous strains of PRRSV have been reported within the United States and Europe.

Read more...

Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS)
During the late 1980's, a new disease appeared to be spreading rapidly through swine herds in the United States and Europe. The disease was characterized by late-term abortions, stillbirths, piglets born weak, and respiratory signs in pigs of all ages. Production losses from the disease were severe.
Find answers...

Control and Eradication of Pseudorabies in Swine
Pseudorabies (Aujeszky's Disease) is an acute, frequently fatal disease affecting most species of domestic and wild animals. The disease is caused by a virus of the Herpesvirus group, and is characterized by a variety of clinical signs--those involving the nervous and respiratory systems being particularly prominent. Pseudorabies is a persistent cause of loss in both cattle and sheep in many countries throughout the world.
Read more...

Control and Eradication of Pseudorabies in Swine
Pseudorabies (Aujeszky's Disease) is an acute, frequently fatal disease affecting most species of domestic and wild animals. The disease is caused by a virus of the Herpesvirus group, and is characterized by a variety of clinical signs--those involving the nervous and respiratory systems being particularly prominent. Pseudorabies is a persistent cause of loss in both cattle and sheep in many countries throughout the world.
Read more...

New Wasting Disease in Swine
Pigs affected with this syndrome waste away starting at 6 to 8 weeks of age. Typically, fewer than 5 percent are affected in a group, but case fatality is high. Affected pigs are usually dispersed throughout a population. The disease does not appear to spread. Those pigs initially developing the syndrome are generally all that will be involved.
Read more...

Prevention and Control of Swine Dysentery
This NebGuide describes the causes and symptoms of swine dysentery and offers management recommendations and treatment procedures for its prevention and control.
Swine dysentery is a highly contagious disease of growing and finishing pigs. First described in Indiana in 1921, it has been called black scours, bloody scours, and vibrionic dysentery.

Read more...

Prevalence of PRRS Virus in the United States
Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS), a pathogen that was unrecognized 10 years ago, has dominated pork industry health concerns around the world. The PRRS virus is widespread in the United States, Europe, and Asia. First referred to as Mystery Swine Disease, research scientists have uncovered many clues as to how the virus effects the pig and made strides regarding diagnosis and control of this pathogen.
Read more...

Controlling Internal Parasites in Swine
Swine internal parasites (worms) are estimated to cost 250 million dollars annually in the United States but they are not considered to be swine killers. Internal parasites devitalize pigs by robbing them of essential nutrients and injuring vital organs. Pigs heavily parasitized are more susceptible to diseases such as scours and pneumonia. The resulting diseases and unthriftiness are a major cause of economic loss. Swine producers should be aware of the common internal parasites of swine and methods of prevention and control.
Read more...

Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS)
A previously unrecognized disease of swine was first described in the United States in 1987. The condition was characterized by abortion, premature farrowing, stillborn and mummified pigs, and respiratory disease with death loss and chronic poor performance of nursing and weaned pigs.
Read more...
Preventing Swine Disease Build-up
Swine disease outbreaks are often related to a high concentration of pigs raised continuously in the same facility or on the same lot or pasture. Overcrowding and continuous use can result in rapid buildup or accumulation of disease producing organisms in the environment. These organisms can infect and keep reinfecting the herd. In addition, the movement of hogs from farm to farm can introduce new infectious disease-producing agents into the herd. The possibility of an outbreak can be greatly reduced by these important methods of removing the cause of diseases:
Read more...

Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome
Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is becoming one of the most economically significant diseases of swine. It causes weak, stillborn and mummified pigs, and sometimes losses of entire litters. This publication describes the disease and ways to prevent its spread.
Read more...

Manure Management, Odor and Diseases Control
Livestock producers are going through much criticism for creating pollution and diseases problems. In the mean time farmers having production problems (costly manure removal, energy consumption, medicine cost and most important barn is not save working place.) One of the long-standing and costly problems of handling manure has been the absence of simple, reliable, accurate and long-lasting system of manure collection and transportation out of the barn, Historically, several methods of manure handling were used in the industry assumed that manure would be held for some time in the barn. The Enterprise tendency to lager livestock production, with a concern for quality of food in efficient environment, requires a number of radical changes and development of new methods for proper and efficient manure management.
Read more...
Infectious Causes of Infertility in Sows
Any time a sow farrows prematurely, there is the fear that additional litters will be lost. An abortion rate of less than 2 percent is considered an acceptable level in most herds. Premature farrowing usually results from nutritional, genetic or environmental stresses, but the exact cause is often unknown
Read more...
European-like PRRS Strain Question/Answer for Practitioners/Producers

NAHMS Swine 2000 Study
In 2000, USDA’S National Animal Health Monitoring system (NAHMS) conducted a study of swine operations within the 17 leading pork-producing states.1 These operations represented nearly 94 percent of the United States swine herd on sites with 100 or more pigs on December 1, 1999.
Read more...

The Veterinarian's Role in Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention of Multidrug Resistant Salmonella typhimurium DT104
Clinical and subclinical Salmonella infections in livestock have long been a source of concern to industry from both the animal disease and human health perspectives (Robinson et al., 1992). Salmonella food poisoning in humans remains one of the major causes of gastroenteritis in the developed world (Cabello et al., 1992).
Read more...

Shedding of Salmonella by Finisher Hogs in the U.S.
"Over 9,000 people are affected by an outbreak of Salmonella." The year was 1954. The place was Sweden. Today, Sweden and many other Scandinavian countries have stringent Salmonella monitoring and control programs. Similarly, in the U.S., a 1993 outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 in the Pacific Northwest and the contamination of ice cream across the Midwest with Salmonella in 1994 ignited public concern for food-borne pathogens.
Read more...

BACTERIAL DISEASES
Most infections are subclinical with Mycoplasma carried in the upper respiratory tract and uterus. The acquisition of primary viral or bacterial respiratory pathogens enhances subclinical mycoplasmal infections. Early signs of overt disease may include a red (porphyrin) oculonasal discharge, and nasal stridor.
Read more...

Euthanasia For Hog Farms
Despite our best efforts to provide for the pigs under our care, we often encounter animals that either fail to respond to treatment or suffer from diseases for which there are no treatments. For these animals, euthanasia is the humane and responsible solution.
Read more...

Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS)
During the late 1980's, a new disease appeared to be spreading rapidly through swine herds in the United States and Europe. The disease was characterized by late-term abortions, stillbirths, piglets born weak, and respiratory signs in pigs of all ages. Production losses from the disease were severe.
Read more...

Porcine Respiratory Disease Complex
Porcine Respiratory Disease Complex (PRDC) is the result of a combination of multiple infectious agents, environmental stressors and production system challenges. Successful intervention requires accurate diagnosis, properly time vaccinations, strategic use of medication, eliminating environmental stressors, and in some cases, changes in production methods.
Read more...

Classical Swine Fever
Classical swine fever (CSF), also known as hog cholera, is a highly contagious viral disease of swine. CSF was eradicated from the United States in 1978 after a 16-year effort by the industry and State and Federal governments. Today, only 16 other countries are free of CSF.
Read more...

Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) Virus
Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) was first observed in 1986 in the United States and in 1990 in Europe. The syndrome was initially called Mystery Pig Disease in the United States since no known swine pathogens could be implicatbed.
Find answers...

Swine Vesicular Disease
History and spread of the disease Swine vesicular disease (SVD) is contagious disease caused by a virus. It was first diagnosed and probably first appeared in Italy in 1966. There was much speculation as to the origin of this apparently new disease, and some laboratory data supported the idea that it was a new virus derived in part from a human enterovirus.
Read more...

The Energy Cost of Illness in Swine
Dirty, less hygienic environments increase the level of immunological stress and depress growth and performance of pigs. In response to challenge by bacterial or viral pathogens, the pig's immune system responds by secreting cytokines. These molecules which promote inflammation were originally described for their ability to orchestrate the immune response against the infectious pathogen.
Read more...

Anatomy of the Respiratory Tract
The respiratory tract of the pig consists of the nose and nasal cavity, nasopharynx and larynx - collectively referred to as the UPPER RESPIRATORY SYSTEM - and the trachea and lungs, the LOWER RESPIRATORY SYSTEM. Everything except the lungs is a "conducting system." It is the lungs that are the true respiratory portion of the system.
Read more...

Diarrheal Disease in Show Swine
Diarrheal is one of the most important problems in show pigs. It can occur at any time, from first obtaining a show pig through the last day of exhibition. It can become a chronic condition that persists for weeks. Diarrheal can be caused by nutrition, infectious diseases, internal parasites or a combination of these.
Read more...
Herd Health Programs for Swine Seedstock Production
This guide outlines good health practices for a seedstock swine herd. Preventive practices are emphasized. Specifics vary from herd to herd and are too individualized to address in this guide. Specifics should be worked out with the herd's veterinarian.
Read more...
Down
Risk of feeding food waste to swine: Foreign animal diseases
Feeding food waste to swine helps producers save money and benefits the public and the environment by reducing landfill use. But studies indicate that unless the waste is cooked first, the introduction of foreign animal disease agents could result.
Read more...
Mycoplasmal Pneumonia and Other Mycoplasmal Diseases of Swine
Swine producers are often confused by the complexity of the mycoplasmal infections; this fact sheet is an attempt to clarify the information that is currently available about these swine diseases.
Mycoplasmal Pneumonia
Mycoplasmal Polyserositis-Arthritis
Mycoplasmal Arthritis

Read more...
Vaccines for Farrowing Operations
Routine vaccination is an essential part of a good swine herd health management program because some economically important diseases are extremely difficult to keep out and are commonly present in many herds. Four swine diseases that fit into this category and for which effective vaccines exist are erysipelas, leptospirosis, parvovirus, and colibacillosis.
Read more...
Enterovirus Encephalomyelitis (previously Teschen/Talfan diseases)
Enterovirus encephalomyelitis (previously Teschen/Talfan diseases) is a severe form of encephalomyelitis of pigs. A milder form of the disease, caused by a porcine enterovirus type I (PEV 1), has also been described in the United Kingdom (Talfan disease) and in Denmark (poliomyelitis suum).
Read more...
Welcome to Antwi Farms !

We work to help people find various information about animal production; as well as to remind everyone, that in our modern world, there are still a lot of places where people have various difficulties feeding themselves: Antwi Farms Project.

Home-- Swine-- Goat-- Sheep-- Cattle--
Poultry-- Contact Us-- Comments--
GHANA - Agric News
ANTWI FARMS FREE CLASSIFIEDS

Submit Your Announcement Here